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Eye Disease Diagnosis & Management

Eye Disease Diagnosis & Management

Visit Us in North, South, & Downtown Calgary for Quick Diagnosis & Treatment of Your Symptoms

Conjunctivitis (Pink Eye)

Treatment for Pink Eye Depends on What Caused It

Treatment for Pink Eye Depends on What Caused It

Pink eye has multiple causes, from bacteria or viruses to environmental factors and chemicals. Each of these causes demands a different treatment, as treating a viral infection with antibiotics will prove to be quite ineffective.

During your visit, we will determine the cause of your pink eye and recommend the appropriate action.

We strongly recommend that you isolate yourself (or your child) if you have a new case of pink eye, especially if it leaves crusty discharge over your eyes in the morning. Bacterial and viral conjunctivitis are both quite contagious, and the pathogen can quickly spread through a classroom or workplace.

When booking your appointment, please specify that you are coming in for pink eye diagnosis.

While most cases of conjunctivitis will clear up without medical intervention, this process sometimes takes several weeks. A diagnosis from an Optometrist, along with subsequent treatment, will dramatically shorten the recovery time and provide quick relief of your symptoms.

  • Signs and symptoms – Conjunctivitis is called “pink eye” or “red eye” because of its primary symptom: a visible reddening of the conjunctiva (a clear layer of cells that exists on top of your eye). Other symptoms include:
    • Increased production of tears
    • A thick yellowish “goopy” discharge that forms over the eye
    • Green or white discharge from the eye
    • Eyes that itch, burn, or have a scratchy sensation
    • Hazy or blurred vision
    • Sensitivity to light
  • Diagnosing conjunctivitis – Signs are assessed using specialized equipment (similar to what we use during a comprehensive eye exam).
    Viral conjunctivitis is generally accompanied by symptoms resembling the common cold and watery eye discharge. Bacterial conjunctivitis is often accompanied by an ear infection and a thick eye discharge. Allergic conjunctivitis varies and may be dependant on pollen/allergen counts, ambient air quality, and other variable factors.
  • Treating conjunctivitis – Treatments vary based on the root cause. Pink eye caused by bacteria can be treated effectively with antibiotics. In some cases, the symptoms will be addressed while the conjunctivitis itself heals over time.

Flashes & Floaters

All About Eye Floaters

What Are Floaters?

Described by a certain famous cartoon baby as the “squiggly line in my eye fluid”, floaters are the grey/black lines and shapes that you see ‘float’ in the center or sides of your vision. Generally, floaters are of no cause for concern- most people will experience them in some capacity or another throughout their lives.

Inside your eye is a gel-like substance called the vitreous (commonly referred to as the vitreous gel). When we are young, the vitreous exists as a gel; as we age, the gel-like vitreous begins to transition to a more liquid state as it dissolves.

However, parts of the gel and microscopic proteins that have clumped together don’t dissolve, creating the floaters that become annoying as they cause vision distraction.

Here’s an interesting fact: when you see floaters you aren’t actually seeing the floaters- you’re seeing the shadow they cast on to your retina.

As mentioned, in the vast majority of cases there is no reason to be concerned by seeing the occasional floater in your vision. However, a sudden increase in the quantity, size, frequency and behaviour of your floaters warrants investigation from an Optometrist.

If you notice a dramatic change in the number of your floaters, as if they are showering across your vision, please come see us immediately. We will perform a comprehensive eye exam in order to ensure overall eye health. Floaters are known symptoms of several serious eye diseases such as retinal detachment or internal eye bleeding, and while it’s unlikely to be the case, it’s still important to rule out eye disease as a cause.

All About Light Flashes

What Are Flashes?

Sometimes referred to as “flashers” or “eye flashers”, this phenomenon appears as bright flashes or spots of light that “dance” through your field of vision. Unlike floaters, which are quite common, flashes are not something commonly experienced by most people.

The retina receives light stimulation and then transfers that stimulus to the brain via the optic nerve in the form of an electrical signal.

Think of this process like an analog stereo connection, where the retina is the microphone, the optic nerve is the cable that connects the microphone to the amplifier, and the brain itself is the amplifier connected to the whole thing. To introduce static (floaters) to the signal, all you need to do is stimulate the microphone by tapping it or moving it. This stimulation will be interpreted by the microphone and sent to the amplifier as an electrical signal, only the amplifier won’t be able to make sense of the input so it will simply render itself as “static”.

In the case of our retina, physical stimulation (such as the vitreous gel physically tugging at the retina as it breaks loose) will cause the brain to render that stimulation as spots or flashes of light in our vision. This is why people that take significant head impacts often “see stars”.

Every new instance of flashes should be assessed. Unlike floaters, which are usually the result of a natural process resulting from the change in state of the vitreous, flashers generally do not occur without cause. While the cause may prove to be benign, eye flashes are known to occur as a result of developing eye diseases or physical problems within the eye (such as a posterior vitreous detachment).

Our Locations

We have three full-service locations in Downtown Calgary, Lake Bonavista and Huntington Hills.

Calgary Downtown

  • Monday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Tuesday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Wednesday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Thursday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Friday 7:30 – 4:30

Lake Bonavista

  • Monday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Tuesday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Wednesday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Thursday 8:30 - 7:00
  • Friday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Saturday 8:00 - 2:00
  • *Note: This office is closed daily for lunch from 12 pm – 1 pm

Huntington Hills

  • Monday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Tuesday 8:30 - 7:00
  • Wednesday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Thursday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Friday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Saturday 8:00 - 2:00
  • *Note: This office is closed daily for lunch from 12 pm – 1 pm
  • Monday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Tuesday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Wednesday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Thursday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Friday 7:30 – 4:30
  • Monday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Tuesday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Wednesday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Thursday 8:30 - 7:00
  • Friday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Saturday 8:00 - 2:00
  • Monday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Tuesday 8:30 - 7:00
  • Wednesday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Thursday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Friday 8:30 – 5:00
  • Saturday 8:00 - 2:00
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